On-the-job sexual harassment can seriously erode a victim’s financial status, job per­formance, career opportunities, psychological and physical health, and personal rela­tionships (Berdahl & Aquino, 2009; Gradus et al., 2008). The financial ramifications of refusing to endure sexual harassment may be severe, especially for people in lower – level positions. Many victims, particularly if they are supporting families, cannot afford to be unemployed. Many find it exceedingly difficult to look for other jobs while main­taining their present job. If they are fired for resisting harassment, they may be unable to obtain unemployment compensation, and even if they do obtain compensation, it will probably provide only a fraction of their former income.

Various surveys report that the great majority of harassed workers (between 75% and 90%) report adverse psychological effects, including PTSD symptoms, eating disorders, crying spells, loss of self-esteem, and feelings of anger, humiliation, shame, embarrassment, nervousness, irritability, alienation, vulnerability, helplessness, and lack of motivation (Harned & Fitzgerald, 2002; Jorgenson & Wahl, 2000; Larsen & Fitzger­ald, 2011).