The concept of male orgasm as the ultimate point of heterosexual intercourse is alien to the concepts and practices of Tantric sex (Yarian & Anders, 2006). Margo Anand, in her book The Art of Sexual Ecstasy (1991), explains that Tantra was an ancient Eastern path of spiritual enlightenment, begun in India around 5000 BCE. Tantric thought holds that an erotic act of love between a god and a goddess created the world. According to this viewpoint, sexual expression can become a form of spiritual meditation and a path of deep connection (Kuriansky & Simonson, 2005).

Sexual Behaviors

I Figure 8.11 The rear-entry intercourse position can be a comfortable option during pregnancy.

In Tantric sex the male learns to control and delay his own orgasm and to redirect the sexual energy throughout his and his part­ner’s body. Before intercourse, lovers usually slowly and erotically stimulate each other. When both partners are ready for intercourse, the woman guides gentle, relaxed penetra­tion. The couple initially keeps thrusting to a minimum, generating energy by subtle inner movements, such as contractions of the mus­cles surrounding the opening of the vagina. The couple harmonizes their breathing, find­ing a common rhythm of inhaling and exhal­ing, while visualizing the warmth, arousal, and energy in the genitals moving upward in their bodies. Movements can become active

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and playful, always slowing or stopping to relax before the man experiences orgasm. The partners welcome feelings of profound intimacy and ecstasy, often looking into each other’s eyes, creating a "deep relaxation of the heart" (Anand, 1991). Research indicates that studying Tantra Yoga improves the physical and psychological aspects of sexual experience (Yekenkurul, 2007).

chapter 8

Summary

Sexual Behaviors