Premature ejaculation is often treated in a variety of ways. Today, popular methods in­clude behavioral cognitive therapy and pharmaceutical treatments (Wylie & Ralph, 2005). Two behavioral techniques are also popular, including the squeeze technique and the stop-start technique. Both involve stimulating the penis to the point just prior to ejaculation. Usually a man practices these techniques alone during masturbation and then with a partner (Heiman, 2002).

With the squeeze technique, sexual intercourse or masturbation is engaged in just short of orgasm and then stimulation is stopped. The man or his partner puts a thumb on the frenulum and the first and second fingers on the dorsal side of the penis (see Figure 14.2). Pressure is applied for 3 to 4 seconds, until the urge to ejaculate subsides. With the stop-start technique, stimulation is simply stopped until the ejaculatory urge subsides. Stimulation is then repeated up until that point, and this process is repeated over and over. These techniques must be used for 6 to 12 months or whenever necessary to control premature ejaculation. For a man to gain some control over his erection of­ten takes 2 to 10 weeks, and within several months, he can have excellent control.

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Подпись: Figure 14.2 The squeeze technique is often recommended in the treatment of premature ejaculation. Pressure is applied either at the top or to base of the penis for several seconds until the urge to ejaculate subsides.
Treating Premature Ejaculation

It is believed that these techniques may help a man get in touch with his arousal levels and sensations. Suggested effectiveness rates have been as high as 98%, although

Подпись: retarded ejaculation Condition in which ejaculation is impossible or occurs only after strenuous efforts. Подпись:Подпись:it is unclear how this effectiveness is being measured (Masters & Johnson, 1970). In ad­dition, many studies fail to mention whether or not the treatment permanently solves the problem or if periodic repetition of the techniques is necessary. Directly following treatment for premature ejaculation, men showed significant gains in length of foreplay, satisfaction with sexual relationships, and increased mate acceptance (DeAmicis et al., 1985). However, these improvements were not maintained 3 years later, and the fre­quency and desire for sexual contact, duration of sexual intercourse, and marital satis­faction all decreased.

As discussed, physicians have been exploring pharmaceutical treatments for PE (Wylie & Ralph, 2005; Renshaw, 2005). Earlier we discussed how certain medications can cause a delay or absence of orgasm. Many of these drugs are being evaluated to see whether they can increase the time needed to ejaculate.