Most established conceptualizations of rape, particularly acquaintance rape, have been based on judgments of female sexual consent (Pineau, 1989). Acquaintance rape is usually defined as nonconsensual forced sex between persons who know each other. Traditionally, mutual consent for sexual activity, in our culture, has been determined by examining whether a woman consented to sexual intercourse. The emphasis on nonconsent is embedded in a cultural context that conceptualizes sexual consent as a woman’s issue. If sexual activity occurs, it is assumed that the woman con­sented. Women’s intent and behavior are seen as the primary indicators of mutually consensual sexual activity. Issues surrounding male consent are absent from attributions regarding mutuality. Thus, a woman is blamed if sexual activity occurs without mutual consent; she is held responsible for failing to adequately monitor the level of sexual activity. Thus, nonconsent has been crucial for determining whether an assault has occurred.